Dairy Queen

Super Fans

Madison, Wisconsin, TCBY franchisee Saad Khalifa is on a first-name basis with his customers, especially those who visit his frozen yogurt shop regularly.

When Steve drives an hour and 35 minutes to the Madison TCBY, Khalifa is ready with the customer’s consistent order of two pies and about 10-12 quarts of ice cream. “And that’s just like clockwork every week,” Khalifa says. “He’ll call in two days ahead and we’ll get everything ready for him.”

Where is Social Media Really Headed?

Now that social media has lost its novelty, Dairy Queen’s Michael Keller is having a flashback as he considers the near-term possibilities for Facebook, Twitter, or whatever buzz-maker might next set fingers a-flutter.

“You know that moment right before you drop on a rollercoaster? You’re very excited, you’re having fun, but there’s a little fear?

“That’s what I’m feeling a lot these days,” confesses the 5,600-unit chain’s chief brand officer.

Scientific Savings

The largest expense that foodservice operators incur, other than food, is employee labor costs. In addition to wages, human capital can cost quick serves countless dollars in employee theft and misuse of the time-management system. With biometric technology, it’s virtually impossible for employees to “beat the system”—resulting in a quick return on investment for restaurant operators.

The Value Equation

In March of 2008, Subway launched a value deal nationwide that already had explosive success in a number of the chain’s South Florida stores. The introduction of the $5 footlong deal across the U.S. was intended to be an answer to the $1 value menus of industry standard-bearers such as McDonald’s and Wendy’s and a new direction for the brand in the wake of its advertising success with Jared Fogle.

Growing Global

When the recession hit in 2008, quick serves in the U.S. got a wake-up call: Even in the Western world, where drive thrus and combo meals were invented, quick serves are not immune to tight wallets and budget cuts.

While brands in the U.S. struggled, some had a saving grace: an international presence. Take Dairy Queen, for instance. Since the brand is still in expansion mode in China, the economic slowdown didn’t affect sales there the way it did in the U.S.

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