Fatburger

Two Become One

Fatburger adapts to sister brand Buffalo’s Café in new cobranded units.

Several quick-service concepts have cobranded with other companies in hopes of leveraging the other brand’s assets, like marketing and menu. But Fatburger is doing something a little different in cobranded locations with its full-service sister brand Buffalo’s Café: It’s adapting much of the latter’s concept, including, in one case, its table-service format.

The 150-unit Fatburger opened three cobranded units with Buffalo’s Café, including one with table service, a full bar, and a patio, and two with a quick-service Buffalo’s Express format.

Delivery Done Right

Though pizza may still be the food of choice for customers wanting something delivered to their door, brands from all categories within the limited-service industry are trying their hand at delivery.

Even one of the biggest concepts in quick service, Burger King, has jumped on the delivery bandwagon by offering the BK Delivers service in select markets around the country, including New York City, Miami, Los Angeles, and other major cities.

Fatburger Continues Expanding Throughout Northern Africa

Fatburger, an All-American burger franchise, has opened its first location in Tunisia. The fast casual restaurant brings its made-to-order burgers to the country’s famous tourist town, Sidi Bou Said. The iconic burger brand was brought to the country by Solitaire Food Service Inc.

 

Fatburger Debuts First Turkey Location in Istanbul

Fatburger, one of Hollywood’s iconic burger franchises, has opened its first location in Turkey’s economic and cultural center, Istanbul. The fast-food establishment was brought to the country’s largest city by Universal Food Company, a franchise partner, which has current locations in Kuwait.

 

The Beef Goes On

Consumer demand for beef is far from disappearing. But rising prices and the desire for more sustainability are forcing the beef industry to evolve.

Beef farmers are improving their operations to answer demand for sustainability.
Ranchers at Meyer Company Ranch in Montana keep a watchful eye on Red Angus cattle.

Miles removed from the nearest highway, shopping mall, and chain restaurant—or any restaurant at all—lie 40,000 acres of forest, meadows, and pastures, home to wildlife of all sorts and 1,400 head of Red Angus cattle. The herd, property of Meyer Company Ranch, roam free under the big sky of Montana, munching on grass and mineral supplements, moving leisurely from one field to the next to avoid over-grazing. Rounded up by real-life cowboys just one day a year for vaccines—not antibiotics, not hormones—the cattle have little reason to stress.

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