KFC

What Went Wrong at Yum

A&W, Long John Silver’s lack of international strength didn’t align with company goals.

Back in mid-2002, optimism reigned at Tricon Global Restaurants, the predecessor to Yum! Brands.    

The Louisville, Kentucky–based company had just purchased nearly 1,000 A&W restaurants and 1,200 Long John Silver’s units for $320 million, convinced that the recognizable names and multibranding possibilities could raise average unit volumes as much as 30 percent and produce upward of $5 billion in incremental system sales alongside nearly $1 billion in additional shareholder value.

But the promise never came true.

Fast Food By Candlelight

Brands aim for a Valentine’s Day she’ll never forget.

With Super Bowl XLV in the books and the Packers heading back to Green Bay victorious, marketing directors everywhere are turning their attention to another winter milestone: Valentine’s Day.

From special products to ridiculous deliveries, a number of quick serves are rolling out promotional campaigns to drum up business for the Day of Love.

Pinkberry, the Los Angeles–based frozen yogurt concept, launched a promotion last week that offers to send a gift on behalf of one Pinkberry customer to another in the form of a “Swirly Gram.”

KFC Sauceless Wings Prompt Search for Wet-Wipe Use

The history of hot wings is saucy, stain-filled, and sticky, but KFC is rewriting history by showing you can have the taste without the mess. To showcase its sauceless, no-mess Hot Wings, the brand is kicking off 2011 with a hunt for groundbreaking thinkers to share creative, inspiring, or charitable ideas for repurposing KFC’s “leftover” wet wipes. Five finalists will be selected to produce videos that illustrate their vision, and America will have the final vote, awarding the person with the tastiest thinking a $10,000 grant for a clean start in the New Year.

The 7 Trends of 2011

You can’t afford to miss these expert predictions.

Restaurant operators have spent 2010 in wait-and-see mode. The economy seems to have survived the financial collapse of 2008—survived being used quite literally here, as in, not died—and is even slowly growing. But consumers are still pinching pennies, and staying afloat in the restaurant industry remains about as difficult as ever.

Why Chicken Really Belongs on a Stick

It’s been breaded, fried, broken into its constituent parts and pieces, and served in a bucket.

It’s been basted, grilled, broken into chunks, and layered over greens and vegetables.

It’s been dressed, pressed, formed into patties, slapped on a bun, and served as a sandwich.

And it’s been roasted, carved up, sliced, diced, and dumped in a delectable broth for use in various soups.

Wake Up Breakfast Proteins

There is an answer to the age-old question of which came first, the chicken or the egg.

It’s definitely the egg—at least when it comes to breakfast. Few morning menus are without them. But these days, chicken and another popular poultry protein, turkey, are increasingly popping up on a.m. menuboards at quick-service and fast-casual restaurants.

Consumers Pick KFC for Healthy Meals … Wait. What?

A new study by CFI Group uncovers the reasons why diners choose quick serves.

A recent study on the opinions of quick-serve consumers finds that price ranks surprisingly low in determining where they choose to eat, that convenience is king, and that KFC draws more health-conscious consumers than the average brand.

Conducted by CFI Group, a consultancy based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, the study surveyed 1,200 consumers who had all eaten at a quick-service establishment in the past three days. The goal was to better understand how they made a basic decision: where to eat.

The Ultimate Food Fight

Matt Loney isn’t taking anything for granted or ignoring any competitor. He insists he knows better, a product of an early professional education on the restaurant industry’s ebbs and flows.

The youthful president of Stevi B’s, an Atlanta-based pizza-buffet franchise that has earned acclaim for its specialty pizzas, Loney has witnessed grocery stores gain a larger slice of the restaurant pizzeria world’s business.

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