Moe's Southwest Grill

That's Hot: Spicy Trio Comes to Moe's

Moe’s Southwest Grill today introduced a new Spicy Trio available for a limited time. 

Moe’s new Spicy Queso and Jalapeno Sour Cream are the featured ingredients of the Spicy Burrito, Quesadilla, and Rice Bowl. The contrasting sensation of the cool sour cream with the fiery jalapeno adds a bold twist to the new menu item. 

The Spicy Queso, which features the smoky chipotle flavor of Moe’s Hard Rock n Roll Sauce combined with its queso, can now be served as a side item with any meal in addition to the Spicy Trio.

Moe's On a “Food Mission”

Moe’s Southwest Grill introduced its "Food Mission," which includes redesigned menu boards that will feature a new food mission wheel “steering” guests to select healthier food choices. These healthy menu options include gluten-free ingredients, vegan-friendly options, and low-calorie meals.

Moe's uses more than 20 fresh ingredients, including hormone-free grilled chicken, beef and even organic tofu. The Atlanta-based chain will also present customers with more than 20 gluten-free ingredients in items such as burritos, rice bowls, and salads.

The Growth 40

Watch: Buffalo Tops Growth 40 List

Sitting on the edge of the U.S.-Canadian border and taking a backseat to another, more cosmopolitan, Empire State city, Buffalo, New York, often falls into the background. The city’s beloved NFL team plays the occasional home game in Toronto, its intense winters freeze out Niagara Falls–bound tourists, and the City of Good Neighbors’ meat-and-potatoes character doesn’t incite a barrage of flashy adjectives.

The Dirty Work

Some might say that the last three years have not been very, well, accommodating for the quick-service industry. With lenders and customers alike pulling their dollars off the table, the industry has been left to make due with the circumstances and struggle to stay afloat until the economic environment warms.

Although the recession created a fair share of hand wringing in quick-serve c-suites, the franchisees have been dealt the biggest blow; they’re the ones tasked with keeping the brand’s operational gears turning, and the slowing dollars, for them, means a slowing livelihood.

The iProblem

Send Paul Damico an e-mail between the hours of 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. and chances are he’ll respond within minutes, no matter where he is.

The CEO of Moe’s Southwest Grill prides himself on his responsiveness and keeps his inbox as empty as possible—a task that’s been a lot easier since the 16-gigabyte iPad was delivered to his office April 3, the day it hit the market. Now the device never leaves his side.

One Sauce Doesn’t Fit All

Using ketchup to dip or slather french fries is a long-established American tradition. The pairing has not only provided consumers with a distinct flavor, but it has given diners the ability to choose how much of the condiment to use, based on their own tastes.

It turns out that this flavor-control ritual also served as the restaurant industry’s foreshadowing of a much larger concept—individualization—that has been sweeping across the industrial world for the past couple of decades.

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