Popeyes

Popeyes' Sailormen Has an Appetite--For a Cure

Sailormen Inc., Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen’s largest franchise in the U.S., continues to shine as champion for families living with progressive muscle diseases in Florida, Alabama, Illinois, Georgia, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Missouri. The company’s innovative “Appetite for a Cure’’ coupon book program in 143 restaurant locations raised a record $421,917 for the Muscular Dystrophy Association during the first quarter of 2011.

Supply Chain Strategy Saves Popeyes a Cool $16M

Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen announced that it managed significant savings in its 2010 supply chain costs—a whopping $16 million in savings, in fact.

The company says the savings helped franchisees improve a full percentage point in restaurant operating profit margins before rent over 2009.

Alice LeBlanc, chief global supply chain officer for Popeyes, says the company managed the big savings because of the diligent time it spent with manufacturers and suppliers.

Popeyes Turns to Tampa for Growth Efforts

Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, a division of AFC Enterprises Inc., announced the launch of an aggressive growth plan to increase its presence in Tampa, Florida. With the company’s dollar share of chicken quick-serve sales at a 10-year high domestically, Popeyes is poised to rapidly expand domestically and is seeking passionate multiunit operators to invest in new restaurants in Tampa.

As part of the company’s 2011 growth plans, the Popeyes development team will be in Tampa to host a franchise seminar on April 12 to share the benefits of owning a Popeyes restaurant.

His Advice? Call Corporate Everyday

After 17 years on the corporate side of quick service, Rob Parsons stepped out of the suit, threw on a purple polo, and opened his first Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen unit in 2009. Having previously worked for the real-estate division of Popeyes and at Denny’s corporate, Parsons helped his first store hit $1 million in sales within just four months.

Tomorrow is Pay Day at Popeyes

Consumers asked and Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen delivered as the brand is bringing back its popular “Pay Day” event, offering eight pieces of its Bonafide Chicken for $4.99. The one-day-only event takes place March 23 at participating Popeyes locations.

Guests will get more bang for their buck at this year’s Pay Day when they “Make it a Meal” by upsizing the offer to add one large side and four biscuits for an additional $5.

Operators Unafraid of Gas Prices—For Now

As the conflict in Libya and tragedy in Japan spike prices at the pump, are your balance sheets safe?

Despite surging gas prices in the face of global disaster and conflict, restaurant operators across the U.S. are trying to stay focused on other challenges—even though gas prices have a slew of direct and indirect impacts on the restaurant business.

“Win/Win/Win” Beverage Deal for Popeyes

Popeyes has reached a multi-year agreement with Dr Pepper Snapple Group (DPS) that will bring Dr Pepper and Hawaiian Punch to more than 1,300 U.S. locations.

Dr Pepper, which is currently on the fountain at just over half of Popeyes’ locations, will add close to 700 new availabilities. In addition, Hawaiian Punch will be available for the first time nationally at Popeyes.

Dave Rollins, senior vice president of fountain foodservice sales for DPS, says the agreement is a win for both companies and Popeyes consumers.

Top Women in Quick Service

Meet the women leading the biggest segment in the restaurant industry.

Just last year, women crossed the 50 percent threshold in the U.S. workforce, and for the first time in history represent the majority of working Americans. Even in our own industry, more than 50 percent of restaurants are now owned by women—a statistic released by the National Restaurant Association just last month.

While women’s accomplishments in the professional and collegiate world are undeniable (for every two men earning a post-secondary degree, three women are graduating), the fact remains that only 2 percent of bosses at America’s largest companies are women.

How to Name Your Concept (and Do It Right)

"A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”

With all due respect, I must disagree with Shakespeare on his famous quote from the play Romeo and Juliet. Perhaps names don’t matter when you’re in love, but they matter a lot in the restaurant business. In fact, I would go so far as to say that the right name can make or break a company.

How to Fix the 'Blind Spots' Everyone Else Sees

Chris Newcomb, cofounder, president, and CEO of Newk’s Express Café, would have called himself an understanding manager. His two co-owners, however, would have described it differently—something along the lines of too forgiving.

“They came to me and said, ‘You sure do give people a lot of chances,’” he says. “And you know what? They were right—sometimes you need to realize when a person’s just not a good fit with your company or your culture. Now I separate my employees’ personalities from their professional skills when I evaluate them from a business standpoint.”

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