Popeyes

Where’s the Money Now?

Many are seeing glimmers of recovery, or even making their own opportunities.

Credit flowed so freely before the recession that people in the restaurant industry often use hyperbole to describe how easy it was to get financing before the collapse.

“I could have gotten my dog a loan three years ago,” says Paul Steck, president of Saladworks.

“The perception was, anyone who can breathe can borrow,” says Mitch Jacobs, founder of On Deck Capital, a lending technology company that works extensively with restaurant operators.

Cajun Turkeys Take Flight from Popeyes

Turkeys and trimmings are just around the corner. Celebrate this holiday season with Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen Cajun turkeys—and what better way to bring one home to your family than free? Participating Atlanta-area Popeyes are working with local radio station V-103 to give away hundreds of Cajun Turkeys in November and December.

These Spuds Aren’t Duds

Potato fries may have originated in Europe, but Americans have certainly embraced them as their own.

After all, nearly 8 billion servings of french fries were sold in U.S. restaurants during the 12 months that ended in June, according to statistics from NPD Group, a global market research firm. That represented 15.5 percent of all restaurant orders.

The Dirty Work

Some might say that the last three years have not been very, well, accommodating for the quick-service industry. With lenders and customers alike pulling their dollars off the table, the industry has been left to make due with the circumstances and struggle to stay afloat until the economic environment warms.

Although the recession created a fair share of hand wringing in quick-serve c-suites, the franchisees have been dealt the biggest blow; they’re the ones tasked with keeping the brand’s operational gears turning, and the slowing dollars, for them, means a slowing livelihood.

It’s the Customers, Stupid. Or Is It?

The industry keeps a keen eye on customer demands. But with the recession still kicking, some executives are finding success in a different approach to business.

In an era when traditional business models and strategic plans often can’t stop bleeding profits, quick-serve executives at QSR’s Dine America conference this week hinted that the new age of business growth may be less about an investment in the consumer—and more about an investment in employees.

The sentiment that a strong brand culture built among employees can translate to a quality experience for the consumer was a reoccurring theme at the conference.

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