Wendy's

Wendy’s Namesake Back in Ads

Dave Thomas’ daughter is back on the airwaves to promote a new menu line named for her father.

Two decades ago, as Wendy’s was mired in a sales slump, the burger chain turned to its founder, Dave Thomas, to serve as its advertising voice.

The move proved fortuitous. After a shaky start, Thomas evolved into the folksy, self-effacing face of the company—and a beloved American character. He remained the heart of Wendy’s advertising until his death in 2002.

Now the chain is trying another member of the Thomas family in commercials. This time, it’s Thomas’ daughter, Wendy, who was the source of the chain’s name and was the model for its logo.

Arby’s Tips its (Red) Hat to Suppliers

Arby’s Restaurant Group, Inc.; ARCOP, Inc.; and Strategic Sourcing Group Co-op, LLC (SSG), honored nine suppliers with Red Hat Supplier Achievement Awards during the Arby’s Worldwide Franchise Convention, on Oct. 3-6 in Phoenix.

The Red Hat Supplier Achievement Awards recognize Arby’s suppliers who have provided superior levels of service and support to the Arby’s restaurant system.

Wendy’s Breakfast 3.0

A leading burger chain hopes its effort to build the morning daypart is “real” this time.

In an effort to grab a share of the fast-growing morning daypart, Wendy’s launched a new breakfast menu in three test markets and part of a fourth.

The nation’s No. 3 burger chain, which has operational headquarters in suburban Columbus, Ohio, is gauging customer sentiment for a quartet of distinctive breakfast sandwiches, a new coffee blend, a value menu, and a handful of side items.

Local Heroes Top Golden Arches

In a recent survey, local brands, fast casuals, and (of course) Chick-fil-A rank at the top of consumer satisfaction list.

Chick-fil-A, Chipotle, and Panera Bread rank among the best quick serves in the country in customer satisfaction, according to a study J.D. Power and Associates released on Tuesday.

The 2010 U.S. Restaurant Satisfaction Study evaluated consumer responses to an online survey that measured four aspects of customer satisfaction: price, environment (ambiance, cleanliness, convenience of location/hours), meal (quality/taste of food, meal presentation, portion size), and service (speed, wait staff courtesy/friendliness). 

One Sauce Doesn’t Fit All

Using ketchup to dip or slather french fries is a long-established American tradition. The pairing has not only provided consumers with a distinct flavor, but it has given diners the ability to choose how much of the condiment to use, based on their own tastes.

It turns out that this flavor-control ritual also served as the restaurant industry’s foreshadowing of a much larger concept—individualization—that has been sweeping across the industrial world for the past couple of decades.

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