Industry News | August 16, 2010

It’s a Big Bucket of KFC Chicken

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To celebrate seven decades of KFC’s Original Recipe, the brand is serving up a world record–setting attempt highlighting the flavor of Colonel Sanders’ famed 11 herbs and spices. KFC will cook up more than 2,000 pounds of fried chicken and unveil it with a giant version of its iconic bucket as it attempts to set the world record for the largest-ever serving of fried chicken, dishing up literally a ton of fried chicken. Free samples will be available for hungry KFC fans eager to help set the record during their lunch hours. The giant bucket for KFC’s record-breaking attempt will be filled in Louisville, Kentucky, around noon on August 17, at the Fourth Street Live! area. KFC supplier Pilgrim’s Pride donated the chicken for the world record–breaking attempt.

An overseas KFC set the record for the world’s largest serving of fried chicken in 2009. Last month, Brookville, Indiana, unofficially broke the record while dishing out 1,645 pounds of chicken.

“To attempt to bring the world record back to its rightful home, Kentucky, we’ve teamed with Pilgrim’s Pride to cook up a giant bucket of fried chicken worthy of the 70th Anniversary of the Original Recipe,” says Doug Hasselo, chief food innovation officer for KFC. “We’re hoping plenty of KFC fans join us in this record-breaking endeavor tomorrow.”

The giant bucket, which is 8 feet tall and 9 feet wide, will feature the graphics seen on the “retro” bucket currently available in KFC restaurants for a limited time. The retro design is the same one used on Kentucky Fried Chicken buckets decades ago, including an image of Colonel Sanders and the patent number for the Original Recipe.

As part of the world record attempt, KFC will also donate thousands of pieces of chicken to the Dare to Care Food Bank in Louisville, an organization that distributes food through a network of 320 independent food pantries, emergency kitchens, and shelters throughout the Louisville area.