Sam Oches

Sam Oches is <i>QSR</i>&rsquo;s editor.
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Start to Finish: Matthew Corrin

I worked in the fashion business, so I became super focused and super aware of the importance of health and wellness and looking great in front of cameras through my first job out of college. And I basically surrounded myself with a bunch of these mom-and-pop delis in Manhattan that were catering to fashionistas and designers, and became a customer of many of these fresh food bars that, while they had very fresh healthy food, they had really dull branding and really lackluster service. There really were no places that catered to convenient, affordable, healthy eating.

The QSR 50

In the $225 billion limited-service restaurant industry, these 50 brands reign supreme.
Biggest quick service restaurant brands build unit counts and system wide sales.
In an attempt to climb out of a same-store-sales growth funk, McDonald’s is refreshing many components of the brand. McDONALD’S

Start to Finish: Amit Kleinberger

Read More About

I’ve always loved foodservice. I started my journey with foodservice as a teenager. I worked at a Subway restaurant as a teen. After that I worked at Burger King and some other food establishments. That’s when I really developed a passion for the foodservice industry. I liked it because, in my nature, I’m about making people happy and being around people. The foodservice industry is an industry that really makes people happy.

Start to Finish: Cheryl Bachelder

I came into the quick-service industry working for Tom Monaghan at Domino’s Pizza in 1995. My responsibilities at Domino’s were marketing and product development. I came from a career of marketing and innovation in the grocery industry at Procter & Gamble, Gillette, and Nabisco, and I brought those skills with me to the restaurant industry and helped Domino’s create exciting advertising, promotions, and new products to draw traffic into the restaurants.

The Chef Revolution

The story of the future of the foodservice industry starts with a man, a man who trained to become a chef, a chef who wanted to do things differently. Or maybe it was that all he could afford to do was something different. But in his first restaurant, different is what he did: different service format, different ingredients, different sourcing partners, different idea of what was possible outside of the fine-dining arena.

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