October 2010

    As the old saw goes, “Necessity is the mother of invention,” and to put it mildly, the Great Recession bred a lot of necessity.

    Every time David Jones opens a Blazing Onion Burger Company, the bar grows.

    Freebirds World Burrito relies on a long list of ingredients and a modern atmosphere to bring customers through the door.

    Several years ago, Marriott executives determined they were letting revenue walk out the front doors of their Courtyard hotels, which are tailored to frequent business tra

    Fast Food Fast

    In the quick-service world, there is a clear expectation for customers who join the drive-thru or in-store queue: to get quality food fast.

    How to Do Drive Thru

    Including a drive-thru component in your restaurant is like adding a separate business, both physically and operationally. Cost-wise, you can expect that about 50 percent of your total capital will go into the drive thru, but, considering the fact that this segment of the business can account for up to 75 percent of your restaurant’s total revenues, that’s a pretty good return on investment. So, if you’re planning to open a new location, a drive thru should be a priority, not an afterthought.

    Pedal to the Metal

    The acclaim for chef Ludo Lefebvre is vast: Classically trained in his homeland of France, Lefebvre studied under some of that country’s best chefs before moving to Los An

    Not Just a Punch Card

    Consumers are visiting quick serves less frequently these days, and restaurants are desperate to secure some customer loyalty to help offset traffic declines.

    The Bistro Solution

    Several years ago, Marriott executives determined they were letting revenue walk out the front doors of their Courtyard hotels, which are tailored to frequent business tra

    The Power of Two

    Marketing professors over the years have lectured students that they should never give a customer too many choices. Quick-serve operators must have missed that class.

    Say This, Not That

    As Berry Chill founder and CEO Michael Farah implemented his plans to open the first of his three Chicago-area locations, he took a bizarre step for a business yet to open