Tal O'Farrell innovated skate boarding then opened a fast food restaurant.
Denise Lee Yohn: QSR's Marketing Guru
If all introductions into the quick-serve market were as relaxed as Tal O’Farrell’s, everyone would be tempted to sign up. O’Farrell is one of San Diego’s skateboard celebs as pioneer of the long-board and co-owner of Sector 9 skateboards. Looking to differentiate his portfolio with something that...
Moms and Millennials offer strong business potential for fast food restaurants.
Denise Lee Yohn: QSR's Marketing Guru
Over the past year and a half that I’ve been writing this column, I’ve hammered home how companies that try to be everything to everyone end up being nothing to no one. Focus has been my main message, as I’ve extolled the benefits of a “less is more” approach. I thought I’d drop down from that 30,...
Geographic information system technology helps operators find good locations.
Quick serves are refining how they use geographic data to create benchmarks for optimal store operations. Today’s tools can help them capture both psychographics as well as demographics. In fact, with iPad in hand, site-selection managers can use cloud computing to bring store analytics to...
Restaurant operators must always keep careful track of their food's origin.
Food Safety
Recent national news about stolen meat making its way into restaurants causes most quick-service operators to shake their heads. It’s hard to believe that operators would take such risks with the safety of their customers and their own business hanging in the balance. But misguided trust in...
The quick-serve industry has taken its share of blows from media and government alike as they suggest fast food is contributing to the nation’s obesity epidemic. And while the industry has risen to the challenge of offering lower-calorie, lower-sodium, and all-around healthier menu offerings, some...
In a big brand change, Pizza Hut added salads and pastas.
Wendy’s tries to become a kids’ place. Pizza Hut adds salad and pasta. Everybody changes their look, and now Burger King hangs up the High King. Why do we make these kind of sweeping changes in our brands? Well, sure, we do it to increase our market share by causing more visits from existing...
Sustainable packaging options are an important tool for eco friendly restaurants
In today’s eco-conscious world, sustainability is no longer a “nice to have”; it is a “must-have” for foodservice brands and an imperative to operate by every day. In fact, 93 percent of corporate CEOs say that sustainability will be critical to the future success of their companies, according to “...
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Industry News
A new campaign from Pei Wei Asian Diner that tied together elements of social media, mobile, and e-mail marketing helped the concept’s new Caramel Chicken entrée become one of its most popular dishes. The various marketing elements directed customers to Pei Wei’s e-mail subscription list by...
Top QSR burger brand Shake Shack had successful IPO stock offering.
When Shake Shack went public in January, its shares were priced at $21. The next morning, the stock began trading at $47 per share, and in May, the price peaked at nearly $97.
Waffle menu development gives QSR operators new ingredient ideas for attracting customers.
A few years back, the Trouble Coffee and Coconut Club in San Francisco’s Outer Sunset neighborhood began selling slices of cinnamon toast for $4.
QSR brands roll out new healthy menu items like nutritious salads.
It’s a rite of passage: In August, well before the actual fall season begins, limited-service brands—especially those among the coffee, doughnut, and bakery-café categories—trip over each other to be the first to market with all fashions of fall-themed goods, from apple-pie this to
QSR chains explore new real estate site selection strategies to maximize business exposure.
In recent years, many limited-service brands have re-evaluated their ideas regarding new restaurant locations.
Top QSR chains leverage big data numbers for restaurant business success.
In April, Josh Patchus began his new job at Cava Grill, the upstart Washington, D.C.–based fast casual.In a world of cooks and cashiers, marketers and managers, Patchus acknowledges that his title—chief data scientist—is an odd one, seemingly out of place at the emerging 14-unit Me
QSR operators move operations systems to cloud based technology.
You would be hard pressed to find a quick-service operator who, when asked why they started their own business, answered by saying it was to become the CIO of the company.