Industry News | February 25, 2016

Roti Begins Offering 100 Percent Grass-Fed Beef

image used with permission.

Roti Modern Mediterranean announces the launch of grass-fed beef at all 21 restaurants in Chicagoland, Washington D.C., and New York City on February 29. The healthy fast casual company recently debuted a name change and appointed a chef and director of culinary operations, Andrew Ashmore. In this role, Chef Ashmore helps the brand further commit to serving “Food that Loves You Back” by making the move to serve all sustainably raised meat.

“Many times the cattle are grain finished in an effort to fatten them up which affects the taste,” says Chef Ashmore. “Because our cattle are 100 percent grass fed, the meat tends to be leaner with a more pronounced, full beef flavor.”

“Food That Loves You Back” means food that you feel great about eating and makes you feel good long after you’re done eating. This is food that rewards you with its great taste, wholesomeness, and amazing quality. Committed to serving a higher quality Steak Roti as a meat option, the restaurants will now use 100 percent grass-fed and pasture-raised beef. Roti Modern Mediterranean believes in better beef for multiple reasons, including it’s better for the cattle, it’s better for the people who consume it, and it’s better for environment. The cattle are not confined to feedlots or forced a diet that is unnatural to them.

“Roti already offers sustainable meats like free range chicken raised in barns, not cages, and salmon sustainably raised with the Seafood Trust Eco Label certification. Our decision to bring about better beef was a natural next step,” says Carl Segal, CEO of Roti Modern Mediterranean. “We’re proud that this new menu item offers added benefits for our consumers, the environment, and the cattle themselves.”

News and information presented in this release has not been corroborated by QSR, Food News Media, or Journalistic, Inc.


Love the idea of Grass Fed is it US? And "Free Range" chicken should not live in a barn should they? Shouldn't "Free Range" mean they have meaningful access to pasture/range?

Hello! Wow, impressive news. Does "grass-fed" mean the cattle is free range, not raised in barns, with free access to fresh green grass, or do you consider hay and sileage, "grass" ? I wonder where in the USA can cows find green grass year round but the idea sounds lovely and yummy.

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