Industry News | October 12, 2009

Think All Fats Are Bad? Think Again

The American Culinary Federation’s Chef & Child Foundation, in conjunction with Clemson University’s Cooking and Healthy Eating Food Specialists (CHEFS) program, released the newest edition of its “Culinary Nutrition News.”

The October edition of “Culinary Nutrition News,” titled “Demystifying Lipids,” discusses healthful, strategic uses of fats, and helps to sort through various misconceptions of them.

“A common misconception is that fat is bad for you. Fats are important in terms of both nutrition and culinary applications,” the article says. “A growing amount of research suggests that certain fats (the unsaturated kind found in plants and fish) may offer protection against heart disease, stroke, inflammation, and type 2 diabetes. Fats are also essential to food for texture, flavor, and nutrient delivery. Ranging from hard solids to liquids, fats are essential to the physical functions of foods.”

The article breaks down the difference between saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats, and also offers advice on the use of fat in sauces, meats, and desserts.

As a series of articles that issues a new edition on the first Monday of each month, “Culinary Nutrition News” is targeted at chefs as a source for nutrition-related and healthy eating information. The content is culled from researchers in the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department, as well as CHEFS, at Clemson University.

“ACF Chef & Child Foundation and Clemson University aim to combat the rise in rates of obesity and chronic diseases associated with poor diet behavior,” states the initiative’s Web site. “Culinary nutrition is the integration of culinary skills and nutrition knowledge to create an innovative outlook on food prepared with culinary confidence and nutrition alertness.”

Past “Culinary Nutrition News” articles have included “Calorie Countdown” and “Fiber-Rich Foods.” The articles have been released monthly since May. November’s subject will be “Downsizing Calories and Portions,” and December will be “Diabetic Makeover.”

The October edition of “Culinary Nutrition News” can be accessed here.

By Sam Oches

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