Industry News | February 3, 2017

Win Schlotzsky's Signature Hot Sauce

Schlotzsky's is kicking up the heat this winter by giving away 100,000 special 3-ounce bottles of its signature hot sauce at restaurants nationwide on Valentine’s Day, but participation of Schlotzsky’s fans is needed to “like” its Facebook Hot Sauce thermometer in order to activate the saucy giveaway.

The online activation will begin January 22 on National Hot Sauce Day, and the giveaway will be uncapped if fans help the hot sauce thermometer reach 100 degrees by February 1. Each “like” will cause the temperature of the thermometer to rise and bring customers closer to uncapping 300,000 ounces of Schlotzsky’s hot sauce at its participating restaurants nationwide February 14, while supplies last.

Schlotzsky’s flavorsome hot sauce, packed with piquant overtones of Louisiana cayenne peppers in a vinegar base, has long been a customer favorite addition to The Original, the sandwich that started it all, as well as other signature sandwiches, Macs, pizzas, flatbreads and more.

“Schlotzsky’s signature hot sauce is hot—and I don’t just mean on the Scoville Scale, but through the enthusiasm we see and feel from our customers adding it to their favorite menu items,” says Schlotzsky’s president Kelly Roddy. “This Valentine’s Day, we’re excited to help folks spice up their culinary creations through our hot sauce giveaway, and given its cult-like following, it may prove to be a pretty easy task for fans to accomplish.” 

Schlotzsky’s hot sauce 12 ounce bottles are available for purchase in store, but because of its fans’ true love of it, we are also making it available for purchase at Schlotzskys.com starting on Valentine’s Day, February 14. And, for hot sauce fanatics who miss the in-store giveaway, Schlotzsky’s can help spread the love on Facebook. For the first 100 people who send Schlotzsky’s a request through Facebook on Valentine’s Day, the brand will send a complimentary 12oz. hot sauce bottle to their designated “hottie” with a special message.

News and information presented in this release has not been corroborated by QSR, Food News Media, or Journalistic, Inc.

Comments

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The common rail system prototype was developed in the late 1960s by Robert Huber of Switzerland and the technology further developed by Dr. Marco Ganser at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, later of Ganser-Hydromag AG (est.1995) in Ober?geri.
The first successful usage in a production vehicle began in Japan by the mid-1990s. Dr. Shohei Itoh and Masahiko Miyaki of the Denso Corporation, a Japanese automotive parts manufacturer, developed the Common Rail fuel system for heavy duty vehicles and turned it into practical use on their ECD-U2 common-rail system mounted on the Hino Rising Ranger truck and sold for general use in 1995.[3] Denso claims the first commercial high pressure common rail system in 1995.[4]
Modern common rail systems, whilst working on the same principle sensor are governed by an engine control unit (ECU) which opens each injector electronically rather than mechanically. This was extensively prototyped in the 1990s with collaboration between Magneti Marelli,Centro Ricerche Fiat and Elasis. After research and development by the Fiat Group, the design was acquired by the German companyRobert Bosch GmbH for completion of development and refinement for mass-production Common Rail Nozzle . In hindsight, the sale appeared to be a tactical error for Fiat, as the new technology proved to be highly profitable. The Common Rail Injector Valve had little choice but to sell, however, as it was in a poor financial state at the time and lacked the resources to complete development on its own.[5] In 1997 they extended its use for passenger cars Common Rail Injector . The first passenger car that used the common rail system was the 1997 model Alfa Romeo 156 2.4 JTD,[6] and later on that same year Mercedes-Benz C 220 CDI.
Common Rail Shim & Gasket kit have been used in marine and locomotive applications for some time. The Cooper-Bessemer GN-8 (circa 1942) is an example of a hydraulically operated common rail diesel engine, also known as a modified common rail.

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