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    White Castle Debuts Next-Generation Impossible Burger in Las Vegas

  • Industry News January 8, 2019
    White Castle
    Over the next few months, the new White Castle Impossible Slider recipe will roll out at all remaining 377 White Castles nationwide.

    Vegas Cravers, rejoice. White Castle will become the first fast-food chain in the city to debut the next-generation Impossible Burger.

    Starting today, the all-new White Castle Impossible Slider recipe from Impossible Foods will be available at White Castle restaurants in the Las Vegas area including on the Strip, Downtown, and in the nearby town of Jean. Over the next few months, the new White Castle Impossible Slider recipe will roll out at all remaining 377 White Castles nationwide.

    “White Castle is Impossible Foods’ largest customer so far, and the partnership has been a total sensation—acclaimed by food critics and a social media phenomenon with a trending hashtag,” says David Lee, Impossible Foods’ chief operating officer and chief financial officer. “There was never any doubt White Castle would get first priority for the national rollout of our new recipe.”

    Tastes Great, Great for the Planet

    Impossible Foods launched its first major product upgrade yesterday in Las Vegas—one of the most anticipated unveils at the world-famous International Consumer Electronics Show. The next-generation Impossible Burger is the only food ever featured as an official exhibition at CES.

    The new recipe of the Impossible Burger rivals ground beef from cows for taste, nutrition and versatility. The next-generation Impossible Burger contains no gluten, 0 mg cholesterol (with 14g total fat per 4 oz. serving) and as much bioavailable iron and protein as conventional beef from cows. (Read more about Impossible Foods’ new recipe here.)

    The all-new recipe is available exclusively at America’s most prestigious restaurants and at White Castles in and around Las Vegas. Over the next month, Impossible Foods will expand availability as production ramps up.

    From White Tablecloth… to White Castle

    Silicon Valley startup Impossible Foods debuted its flagship product in 2016 at Momofuku Nishi, the zeitgeisty Manhattan restaurant owned by celebrity chef David Chang. The Impossible Burger has since expanded to more than 5,000 restaurants in the United States and select Asian regions.  

    In April 2018, the White Castle Impossible Slider debuted in three key regions, and sales were 30 percent higher than White Castle’s original expectations. In September 2018, White Castle CEO Lisa Ingram shared that the Impossible Slider increased market share 250 percent over White Castle locations that did not serve it. As a result, White Castle expanded availability of the plant-based burger to all restaurants in 13 states across the country.

    Hailed as “one of America’s best fast-food burgers,” the plant-based White Castle Impossible Slider is topped with cheese, pickles, and onions and served on a signature bun.

    More Taste, Less (Greenhouse) Gas

    Based in Redwood City, Calif., Impossible Foods uses modern science and technology to create wholesome and nutritious food, restore natural ecosystems and feed a growing population sustainably. The company makes meat from plants—with a much smaller environmental footprint than meat from animals.

    To satisfy the global demand for meat at a fraction of the environmental impact, Impossible Foods developed a far more sustainable, scalable and affordable way to make meat, without the environmental impact of livestock.

    Shortly after its founding in 2011, Impossible Foods’ scientists discovered that one molecule—“heme”—is uniquely responsible for the explosion of flavors that result when meat is cooked. Impossible Foods’ scientists genetically engineer and ferment yeast to produce a heme protein naturally found in plants, called soy leghemoglobin.

    The heme in the Impossible Burger is identical to the essential heme humans have been consuming for hundreds of thousands of years in meat. And while the Impossible Burger delivers all the craveable depth of beef, it uses far less land and water, and emits only a fraction of the greenhouses gases of beef from cows. 

    News and information presented in this release has not been corroborated by QSR, Food News Media, or Journalistic, Inc.